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square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying in part, quote, we call for calm and encourage all parties to work together and call for all egyptians to resolve their differences over these important issues peacefully and through democratic dialogue. jim maceda will join us coming up in 20 minutes right here. >>> turning from egypt now to the border between israel and gaza where a two-day cease fire is already being tested. israeli troops shot and killed a 20-year-old man on the gaza side of the line today. the first death since the truce. nbc news reporting that the man was trying to get to his family farm. we have coverage from both sides of the border to
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
of the united states. >>> tens of thousands of protesters crowd the streets of cairo after president morsi draft as new constitution overnight. we'll get a live report and what's next for ambassador susan rice after her week of meetings on capitol hill to try to end the back and forth over benghazi? we'll get the political postscript with mark murray. be sure to check out the news nation tumbler page. you'll find lots of behind the scenes -- there's one right there. it's news nation.tumbler.com. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more
. >>> egypt is poised for more demonstrations in cairo tomorrow over a new constitutional crisis. president muhammed morsi's challenge to the judiciary involving holdovers from the mubarak regime and raulong traditions. joining me is ambassador dennis ross. thank you so much. good to see you. >> you too. >> egypt. now, perhaps morsi felt empowered by his role as a peacemaker on gaza, but he ran right into long-standing traditions. >> he did. he did. i think bear in mind a couple of things. number one, he felt that the role he played made him a central figure in the region as a whole. in mubarak's last few years, the fact was mubarak was increasingly on the sidelines, not playing a major role in the middle east. here's president morsi thinking he can play on the image they are a leader in the region and he can use that as a device to make a move internally. he made that move but i think it's a clear miscalculation because he took on the independents of the judiciary. it doesn't matter that. these were leaders who were holdovers from the mubarak regime, they still represented a symbol of inde
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
to address the nation. before that atresz, more violence today in the streets of cairo. protesters demanding president morsi rescind his decree once again clashing with police. there are calms for giant protests coming up for tomorrow as well as saturday. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel joins us live from cairo with more on this. president morsi, richard, is expected to address the nation at the top of the hour. do we have any information about what he's going to say basically trying to calm the crowds that are expected to protest? >> reporter: yeah. i think what he's going to say, however, is not going to calm these crowds. it is only going to make them more angry. he's probably going to set a date for a referendum on the constitution. as you said, a week ago today, president morsi gave himself extraordinary powers. he made himself more powerful than any previous egyptian presidents. more powerful than the kings of egypt, in fact. he said that his word was law. that in decree that he issued could not be overturned by the supreme court, by any court in this land. his word
three of you. >>> want to show you live pictures we have coming into us from cairo this hour. tens of thousands of protesters in tahrir square right now standing in opposition to president mohamed morsi and the constitution that was approved earlier today. nbc's richard engel is going to join us live in a moment. >>> possible big news coming from the supreme court today on marriage equality in america. the nine justices are meeting right now. >>> and today's big question. fiscal cliff hardball. should the president be on the road or back in washington hammering out a fiscal cliff compromise? tweet me @thomasaroberts or on facebook. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank
option would be a ground invasion, tamron. >> martin, thank you very much. in cairo today thousands gather to protest the gaza air strikes demanding that the egyptian government cut ties with israel. that's a development in the region. let's bring in "time" magazine international editor jim frederick. you heard the reports with me. martin fletcher indicating that perhaps not even net uh-hy neta anyone knows what the next phase will be? >> the next 48 hours are critical because the deputy foreign minister basically threatened hamas. you might have a ground offensive. the very important thing to keep our eye on over the next 48 hours is that yippian president morsi is meeting with the prime minister from turkey. they're meeting in cairo. these are two crucial countries. on one hand you have -- they're both large populations. historic allally they're wester friendly. they're anchors between israel and their neighbors. he's probably the most distinguished and elder statementsmen in the region, and morsi is new and democratically elected and trying to make his mark as a statesman himself
in cairo and the video as opposed to, no, this was a terrorist attack. my take away was that, you know, their initial reaction was it was a response to what was going on in cairo but there may have been also other elements of terrorism there and from there it went to secretary rice who seemed to focus just on the video rather than saying it was a lot of different things. so i'm kind of in the middle on this in my dissection. i do think petraeus did say that there's a lot of things that play here but once he released that to the administration, they chose to focus primarily on the video and not so much on the other elements. i really don't know why they did that. it doesn't really make sense to me. but that's pretty much how today went. >> sir, if senator john mccain has called for a watergate style investigation into the attack, basically asking for a select committee coming out earlier this week with senators to say they aren't going to get enough information through what we're seeing in the testimony of petraeus and thinks there is an under current here of something else. do you agre
in benghazi were spontaneously inspired by the protests at the u.s. embassy in cairo and evolved into a direct assault against the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi and subsequently its annex. there are indications that extremists participated in the violent demonstrations." and, of course, that's exactly what ambassador rice told the american people. >> our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo. we believe that it looks like extremist elements individuals joined in that -- in that effort. >> ambassador rice reported exactly what she was told by the cia. and testifying behind closed doors on capitol hill today, general david petraeus backed her up. looks like maverick mccain's flying solo with his fake talk express. joining me now is congressman gary ackerman, democrat from the new york, and senior member house foreign affairs committee and ryan grim, washington bureau chief of the "huffington post." he's writing about john mccain's call for a committee to investigate the benghazi atta
the mobilization of 75,000 army reservists. joining us now is nbc live from gaza. as peace talks continue in cairo, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a fi
in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend its
in the last couple of years. he has not achieved the breakthroughs that he wanted when he went to cairo in 2009. and while many on his team have abandoned the playing field, mitchell, dennis ross, this is a unique opportunity for him to reinvigorate his middle east leadership and bring a new team in with new ideas and strategies to resurrect the commitments he made in cairo which is essential to u.s. long-term interest. >> the other relationship is the one between the president and prime minister -- mr. netanyahu, who actually praised the president's diplomatic efforts within this. he's got an election coming up. it's been something of a rocky relationship, if you will. how does this -- the president's involvement strengthen his relationship with netanyahu going forward? >> there's been all this criticism of this relationship, the dysfunctionalty over political issues, negotiations. one thing that's quite clear to me in watching the president very carefully, after the election, he didn't need the jewish vote in florida or new york, and yet he stood up to the plate, he had his reels back
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast-track a new constitution being wr
in cairo and a direct assault. extremists participated in the violent demonstrations. petraeus testified that he and others knew al qaeda-aligned terrorists were involved in the attack, but ultimately, they removed the language from the declassified talking points that susan rice used. terrorism, pert michael lighten says "this is a common practice in intelligence briefings." >> it's a place the intelligence community has to be is having classified information and having to talk about it publ publicly. the unclassified statements often appear to be misleading, but what they are doing is protecting the sensitive information which is in the classified realm. >> senator conrad told it like it is. >> what is very clear is that ambassador rice used the talking points that the intelligence committee had all signed off on. that is very, very clear. she used the unclassified talking points that were signed off on by the entire intelligence community. so criticisms of her are completely unwarranted. that is very clear. >> let me paraphrase president obama. could you say that a little louder, sena
. joining me by phone from cairo, nbc's correspondent jim masseda. let's talk about what sparked these protests. is it all over morsi granting himself these further powers? >> reporter: yes, alex, it is about that. he came out, by the way, a good hour ago to talk, to speechify about the presidential powers. that's about four or five miles away from what you're describing, which is at tahrir square, the famous tahrir square. morsi spoke to his supporters saying that he had to do this to break really what is a log jam in writing up a new constitution. he was saying much of the judiciary are very honorable people but there are five or six or seven bad eggs, if you will. these are remnants of the mubarak regime and they're constantly interfering with the process. meanwhile, the country is continuing to be mired in poverty, a lack of social justice and what have you. so he says to protect the revolution, to protect the principles of the revolution and to protect this country's forward movement towards democracy he needed to do this to keep the constitution and the writing of the const
this is the epicenter of the violence that is taking place, all eyes are in cairo, egypt. the head of egypt's intelligence has met with lead others palestinian factions. they say they're committed to a ceasefire under two conditions. one is that israel promises or at least pledges or guarantees that it will not resume targeted assassination and the deliberate killing of palestinian leaders and a lifting of the blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006, which has restricted the free movement of people and goods and has really created a humanitarian crisis here. so they want to see that siege lifted. the egyptian, we understand, are expected to or may have actually communicated that to the israelis. and so it is now dependent on whether or not they can get the two sides to a cessation of hostilities, and when that time frame would unfold. so there is still no clear official timeline or clear answer, and no clear commitment from either side. but those interest demands as we understand them as they are being negotiated from the palestinian side. >> all right. live in gaza, tha
, by the time it was getting ready to announce it in cairo, there was a great sense of anxiety that, in fact, the truce slipped out of the party's reach because we woke up on tuesday morning, yesterday morning, with a great sense of optimism there will be a cease-fire. by last night, it looked like it was out of reach and a great sense of desperation this morning. in fact, almost a spike of overnight killings. the death toll 146. 34 in one day's count and people this morning were waking up to very different feelings than they were yesterday. soldiers on the border. people very much afraid of a ground invasion. perhaps it was thedy ploy sy of secretary clinton to salvage this. they're not out of woods to use that expression but no sense that this evening will be a lot or at least relatively calmer than it was over the past eight nights. >> coming to the cease-fire and the agreement that was made, what are the conditions that hamas was willing to bring to the table to negotiate with? >> reporter: well, hamas is willing -- hamas and the palestinian factions part of it willing to stop all rocket
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good new
closer to a deal to calm clashes in cairo? and why does what happened there matter here? that's next. with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. in a meeting w
. 180 metro areas have jobless rates below 7%. outside the u.s. protesters jammed cairo protesting a decree by president morsi. now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." u.s. congressman tom cole of oklahoma signaled republicans should accept president obama's tax offer. earlier today the president made note of it. let's listen. >> i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> congressman, thank you for joining us tonight. give us your thinking about why it's important, i know politically it makes sense to many people, middle class, people making up to $250,000 a year, get the tax cut continued but people above are basically decoupled from that much larger group of people. >> well, chris, i don't think taxes ought to go up for anybody. i think it's bad economic policy. it will eventually cost us jobs and eventually slow the e
's likely to inflame the political crisis there. we're live in cairo with what it all means for the region. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. he is in pennsylvania at the toy factory talking fiscal cliff. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] >>> mitt romney made it to the oval office yesterday, bu
normal force. >>> and we have brand-new video from cairo where the arab league is holding emergency meetings on the crisis. also today the white house urged diplomacy and a deescalation in the violence. let's get right to it on the ground and inside gaza where rockets are flying overhead. nbc's news correspondent is there for us live. let's get to what's happening right up now around you. >> reporter: well let's start off here with the situation in gaza. right now it is really quiet behind me. the streets of gaza are really empty. most people this time of night go to their homes. the streets are pretty much quiet. people here really bracing themselves for what the night usually brings. what we've seen over the course of the last several nights is an intense aerial campaign by the israeli forces. as you mentioned yesterday, the palestinian prime minister's office was destroyed. these air strikes will be intensifying in the coming hours. that's been the pattern. there's also been palestinian rocket fire coming out of gaza into southern israel. the fear that grips the people here is on
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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